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Review: Officer Elvis – Gary Gusick

Posted on: April 23rd, 2015 By Rick Rhodes
Officer Elvis
Publisher: Alibi (April 21, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10:
ISBN-13: 978-
Order e-book here:
amazon

Synopsis:

Someone in Mississippi doesn’t seem to like people impersonating the King. In fact it’s disliked so much, that these impersonators are getting knocked off one by one. Lieutenant Darla Cavanaugh needs to find out who and why, before more are killed.

Characters:

Lieutenant Darla Cavanaugh – Member of the Mississippi Bureau of Investigation.
Rita Gibbons – Darla’s partner, and a big Elvis fan.

Review

The story begins with Tommy Reylander, known to the people in his town as Officer Elvis, performing a show in a senior center. We get to see how obsessed he was, from the expensive jumpsuits, to making his girlfriend look like Priscilla, and even calling her Cilla. Everything about him oozed Elvis. As he leaves in his Pink Cadillac, he is blown up, and marked Return to Sender.

The case is given to Darla Cavanaugh who requests Rita Gibbons for her partner. At first they think it’s a personal vendetta, but when a second impersonator is killed, leaving them All Shook Up, they determine that it’s probably a serial killer.

Their investigation leads them all over Mississippi and the surrounding areas, meeting various Elvis Impersonators, scummy business men, and obsessed fans. The ride along with them is quite entertaining and the author really captured the feel of the southern lifestyle I felt. The plot was very creative, who hasn’t found some of the less than stellar Elvis impersonators annoying.

Overall I found it to be an enjoyable story, with a huge twist that felt true to the whole Elvis story. So if you enjoy some rather lighthearted thrillers, Don’t be Cruel and pick up a copy of Officer Elvis. Be sure and stop back by and let us know what you thought. Thank you. Thank you very much.

About the Author

Gary Gusick Gary Gusick is a former advertising executive with more than thirty years experience as a copywriter and creative director. He is a winner of numerous national and international awards for creative excellence in advertising. The Last Clinic is his first novel.

*Disclaimer* A special thanks goes out to Lisa at TLC Book Tours for a review copy of this book. It in no way influenced my review. You can discuss it here or join my facebook page and discuss it there.

Review: A Feast for Crows – George R. R. Martin

Posted on: April 21st, 2015 By Rick Rhodes
 A Feast of Crows
Mass Market Paperback: 1104 pages
Publisher: Bantam (September 26, 2006)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 055358202X
ISBN-13: 978-0553582024
Order book here:

amazon

Order E-book here:
amazon

Synopsis:

The never-ending struggle for the Iron Throne continues throughout Westeros with forces coming from all directions to claim it for themselves. Who will survive A Feast for Crows.

Characters:

Jon Snow – Illegitimate son of Ned Stark, Member of the Night’s Watch.
Sansa Stark – Oldest Daughter of Ned Stark
Arianne Martell – Princess of Dorne, and oldest child of Doran Martell.

Review

This was originally going to be one book. However, it was so large, that George R. R. Martin decided to split it into two books, this volume, and the companion volume Dances with Dragons. Each books focuses on half the characters, and one side of the world. In this case, it’s the people in and round Westeros.

A Large part of this novel focuses on the people of Dorne. Up until this point, we the readers haven’t seen much of Dorne. We’ve seen Oberyn Martell rather briefly in A Storm of Swords. This time we see many of his children, siblings, etc. This to me was one of the more interesting aspects to this story. I loved the daughters of Oberyn. The one aspect of the story that didn’t appeal to me, was the storyline with Arianne Martel and Myrcella Baratheon. Even after reading the whole series, I have no clue what that whole section was about.

Cersei Lannister in King’s Landing is facing problems of her own. A religious fundamentalist group has began a rise to power, and they aren’t very happy about her past behaviors. This storyline I rather liked, because after all her machinations in previous novels, she finally gets a bit of payback for her behaviors. Karma is indeed a bitter companion.

Arya Stark has arrived in Braavos and is beginning her training in the ways of Black and White. She’s fascinated with the thoughts of revenge and killing those who hurt her family. It may be the dark side of my soul, but I find her to be one of the more interesting characters in the whole series.

But in true Martin fashion, those are just some of the story threads you’ll read about in Feast of Crows. There are plenty more. Overall, this wasn’t my favorite book of the whole series. It just seemed to drag at times, and while it introduced a lot of new and interesting characters and places, nothing really seemed to move forward much.

If you’ve been reading A Song of Fire and Ice though, you’ll need to read this. If you haven’t, you’re really missing out. It’s a great fantasy series and while long winded and confusing in parts, takes you on a great ride. Definitely check it out, and stop by and let us know what you thought.

About the Author

George R.R. Martin sold his first story in 1971 and has been writing professionally since then. He spent ten years in Hollywood as a writer-producer, working on The Twilight Zone, Beauty and the Beast, and various feature films and television pilots that were never made.

In the mid ’90s he returned to prose, his first love, and began work on his epic fantasy series, A Song of Ice and Fire.

He has been in the Seven Kingdoms ever since. Whenever he’s allowed to leave, he returns to Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he lives with the lovely Parris, and two cats named Augustus and Caligula, who think they run the place.

You can discuss it here or join my facebook page and discuss it there.

Review: Unelmoija – Elle Boca

Posted on: April 16th, 2015 By Rick Rhodes
Unelmoija - The Dream Shifter
Print Length: 208 pages
Publisher: Poyeen Publishing (November 24, 2013)
Language: English
ISBN-10:
ISBN-13: 978-
Order e-book here:
amazon

Synopsis:

A young girl begins on a journey of discovery. What is she discovering? That she’s no mere human, but something known as a Weeia, with very special powers. But then she finds out there are those wanting to kill her because of those powers.

Characters:

Amy McKnight – A young woman discovering her special abilities.
Thomas McKnight – Amy’s Father and one of the most powerful Weeia’s.
Duncan Bittersdorp – A young man about Amy’s age, with a different set of powers.

Review

I don’t typically read a lot of Urban Fantasies. When the opportunity comes along, I’ll read them, but they aren’t something I’ve typically gone out of my way to find. I’m not sure why, because when I’ve read them, I’ve enjoyed them. But when it comes to fantasy, I’m more of a classical Lord of the Rings fantasy fan. That being said though, I really appreciate the genre, and Unelmoija is no exception.

Elle Boca seems to follow the classic Hero’s journey model. The role of the reluctant adventurer is filled nicely by Amy. The mentor figure is in the guise of Duncan Bittersdorp, he becomes a kind of Obi-Wan Kenobi to Amy, teaching her about the Weeia, her powers, the political organization of her people, etc.

Along her journey, Amy is met with many dangers, some life threatening, some emotionally devastating. But it’s watching her journey, and her growth and acceptance of her powers that draws you along through the story. As this is the first chapter in a 5 books series, I’m not completely sure of the overall plot as of yet. The author leaves a lot of questions at the end. Why are they trying to kill Amy, and who are they? Is her father, a good guy, or evil personified. Like you, I’ll simply have to read the next novel in the series to find out.

If you are a fan of Urban Fantasy, and the idea of Vampires and Werewolves leave you with Not another one, then you’ll find this a refreshing story. It comes across as more of a female superhero story, with her, much like young Peter Parker, discovering the extent of her power and what having them means to her future. So for all you Urban Fantasy fans out there, check out Unelmoija: Dreamshifter. Be sure to drop back by and let us know what you thought.

About the Author

Elle Boca Elle is the author of the Miami Weeia urban fantasy series about superhumans. Growing up the only child of a monkey mother and a rabbit father she learned to keep herself entertained and spend time reading.

*Disclaimer* A special thanks goes out to Elle for a review copy of this book. It in no way influenced my review. You can discuss it here or join my facebook page and discuss it there.

Review: How to Tell if Your Cat is Plotting to Kill You – The Oatmeal

Posted on: April 14th, 2015 By Rick Rhodes
How to Tell If Your Cat is Plotting to Kill You
Paperback: 136 pages
Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing; Pap/Pstr edition (October 9, 2012)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1449410243
ISBN-13: 978-1449410247
Order book here:

amazon

Order E-book here:
amazon

Review

Anyone that has ever owned a cat, will find things to chuckle at in this book. From signs on how to tell your cat is trying to kill you, to cartoons about cats at work. Some of the jokes are much funnier than others, but they all strike a chord of truthfulness. For yourself as a cat lover, or for the cat lover in your life, you definitely want to check this book out. Be warned though, there are some comic bits with very strong language, so this is definitely for adults.

About the Author

Brilliantly whimsical yet oddly informative, TheOatmeal.com is an entertainment Web site full of comics, quizzes, and stories. The site gets more than 5 million unique page views a month; 250,000 blogs and Web sites have linked to it. TheOatmeal.com is written, drawn, and coded by Matthew Inman, a king of all trades when it comes to the Web. Matthew lives in Seattle, Washington. He subsists on a steady diet of crickets and whiskey. He enjoys long walks on the beach, gravity, and breathing heavily through his mouth. His dislikes include scurvy, typhoons, and tapeworm medication.

You can discuss it here or join my facebook page and discuss it there.

Review: A Ghostly Grave – Tonya Kappes

Posted on: April 9th, 2015 By Rick Rhodes
A Ghostly Grave
Mass Market Paperback: 288 pages
Publisher: Witness (March 31, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0062374818
ISBN-13: 978-0062374813
Order book here:

amazon

Order E-book here:
amazon

Synopsis:
There’s a ghost on the loose—and a fox in the henhouse

Four years ago, the Eternal Slumber Funeral Home put Chicken Teater in the ground. Now undertaker Emma Lee Raines is digging him back up. The whole scene is bad for business, especially with her granny running for mayor and a big festival setting up in town. But ever since Emma Lee started seeing ghosts, Chicken’s been pestering her to figure out who killed him.

With her handsome boyfriend, Sheriff Jack Henry Ross, busy getting new forensics on the old corpse, Emma Lee has time to look into her first suspect. Chicken’s widow may be a former Miss Kentucky, but the love of his life was another beauty queen: Lady Cluckington, his prize-winning hen. Was Mrs. Teater the jealous type? Chicken seems to think so. Something’s definitely rotten in Sleepy Hollow—and Emma Lee just prays it’s not her luck.

Characters:

Colonel Chicken Teater – Deceased wealthy landownwer and prize chicken owner.
Emma Raines – Undertaker, Amateur detective, and in betweener.

Review

This is the second novel in the author’s Ghostly Southern Mystery Series. Let me start by saying that I’m loving this series. The characters are quirky and fun. The plots are not overly complicated. The entire story is written with a great sense of humor.

It’s great fun to follow along with Emma, as she tries to communicate with the dead, without everyone thinking she’s lost her mind. A subplot to this story is that of her grandmother running for mayor.

Each character in itself is well designed, and has it’s own separate personality. Chicken Teater for instance, even though dead, still has a longing for Sweet Tea.

I think this book and series would find a great audience with those who love Cozy Mysteries. While there is a little violence it’s not way over the top, so I’d rate this as PG-13 for teens and older.

But it’s definitely on my recommend list, and I look forward to the next entries as they come out later on this year.

About the Author

Tonya KappesFor years, USA Today bestselling author Tonya Kappes has been self-publishing her numerous mystery and romance titles with unprecedented success. She is famous not only for her hilarious plotlines and quirky characters, but her tremendous marketing efforts that have earned her thousands of followers and a devoted street team of fans.

HarperCollins and Witness Impulse is thrilled to be publishing this insanely talented and wildly successful author for the first time with A GHOSTLY UNDERTAKING (Witness Impulse; February 24, 2015; $7.99 mass market), the first in her hilarious and spooky Ghostly Southern series.

*Disclaimer* A special thanks goes out to Andrea at Witness/Impulse for a review copy of this book. It in no way influenced my review. You can discuss it here or join my facebook page and discuss it there.

Review: A Killing At The Creek – Nancy Allen

Posted on: April 7th, 2015 By Rick Rhodes
A Killing At The Creek
Print Length: 220 pages
Publisher: Witness Impulse (February 17, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: n/a
ISBN-13: 978-n/a
Order e-book here:
amazon

Synopsis:

While delivering a school bus, a woman is savagely murdered. The suspect turns out to be a 15 year old kid. Elsie Arnold and the Prosecutor’s office must build a case against him, while simultaneously avoiding destroying the case through their own mistakes.

Characters:

Elsie Arnold – City Prosecutor.
Tanner Monroe – Young Man on trial for murder.
Bill Ashcroft – Detective investigating murder.

Review

Ms. Allen in her second novel, set in the Ozark mountains, managed to keep me quite entertained. The book opens with a blood soaked bus and a male figure covered in blood. We can see from this beginning that the male is someone you should be frightened of. He truly gave me the creeps.

The character of Elsie, while likeable, I’m not sure is someone I’d want representing me. She’s so eager to be given a murder case, that at times she crosses the line. She does things that shouldn’t be done out of a need to impress others working on the case.

The character of Tanner Monroe kept me guessing the entire time. Did he do it? Did the other guy he talked about exist? Is he insane or just a great manipulator.

The plot isn’t a mystery in the classical who done it sense, but more of a did he do it, and if so why? But mostly it’s about Elsie, about building the case for murder, and about how fragile a case can be.

Overall, it was a great story, and for all those of you who love the legal thriller, I think you’ll find this book to be right up your alley. So give it a shot, and drop back by and let us know what you thought.

About the Author

Nancy AllenNancy Allen practiced law for fifteen years as Assistant Missouri Attorney General and Assistant Prosecutor in her native Ozarks. She’s tried over thirty jury cases, including murder and sexual offenses, and is now a law instructor at Missouri State University. Her debut novel, a legal thriller entitled The Code of the Hills, was published in 2014 by HarperCollins/Witness. The second book in her Ozark mystery series is A Killing at the Creek.

*Disclaimer* A special thanks goes out to Andrea at Witness/Impulse for a review copy of this book. It in no way influenced my review. You can discuss it here or join my facebook page and discuss it there.

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Review: A Storm of Swords – George R. R. Martin

Posted on: April 2nd, 2015 By Rick Rhodes
Mass Market Paperback: 1216 pages
Publisher: Bantam (March 4, 2003)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 055357342X
ISBN-13: 978-0553573428
Order book here:

amazon

Order E-book here:
amazon

Characters:

Brienne of Tarth – A Female Knight.
Arya Stark – The youngest, headstrong Stark Daughter.

Synopsis:

*********************** Warning Spoilers may apply for those who have not read the previous books *******************

The War of the 5 Kings is covering the major part of the landscape. Who will reign victorus. Will it be Joffrey Baratheon, Stannis Baratheon, Robb Stark, or are there other unseen forces waiting to seize the throne?

Review

The Third installment in George R. R. Martin’s Epic Fantasy series A Song of Fire and Ice. Brienne of Tarth is charged with returning Jaime Lannister to King’s Landing in exchange for Arya and Sansa. Along the way she must face many adversaries with their own agendas.

Robb Stark is busy trying to keep his army together as they continue to win battle after battle, while his little sister Arya finds herself on the run and joining with a group of rebels. Meanwhile, at the Wall, Jon Snow and his brothers find themselves defending the wall against a horde of wildlings.

This was the longest book in the series, and at times really seemed to drag a bit. While there was a lot of blood spilled, a lot of storyline, and a lot of action, there was also a lot that just seemed to drag me out of the story. George R. R. Martin can spin a great story, but there are times where he seems to spend way too much time on descriptive prose.

That being said though, I liked the book, and will continue on to read the last two in the series. I’m anxious to find out what occurs with all these characters, and that is where the strength of these novels come in, is in character development.

For those of you into the series, or lovers of fantasy novels, you definitely want to pick up this series. But for readers with limited attention spans, I don’t think this series would be for you. Definitely for older teens and adults to the violent content, language, sexual situations, etc.

If you give it a read, drop back by and let us know what you thought.

About the Author

George R.R. Martin sold his first story in 1971 and has been writing professionally since then. He spent ten years in Hollywood as a writer-producer, working on The Twilight Zone, Beauty and the Beast, and various feature films and television pilots that were never made.

In the mid ’90s he returned to prose, his first love, and began work on his epic fantasy series, A Song of Ice and Fire.

He has been in the Seven Kingdoms ever since. Whenever he’s allowed to leave, he returns to Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he lives with the lovely Parris, and two cats named Augustus and Caligula, who think they run the place.

You can discuss it here or join my facebook page and discuss it there.

Review: The Organ Takers – Richard Van Anderson

Posted on: March 31st, 2015 By Rick Rhodes
The Organ Takers
Paperback: 292 pages
Publisher: White Light Press; First edition (November 17, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0990759717
ISBN-13: 978-0990759713
Order book here:

amazon

Order E-book here:
amazon

Synopsis:

A disgraced doctor is on the verge of rebuilding his medical career, when he’s approached to help a mysterious organization harvest organs. To refuse, may cost him his life, or worse, the life of his family.

Characters:

David McBride – Lab Technician, with a background in donor organ removal.
Mr. White – A Mysterious figure controlling David’s strings.

Review

This story begins dark, and proceeds to get darker from that point on. We initially see a man named Michael Smith. He sits up, and notices a pain in his side. He stumbles to the street where he collapses. He’s taken to the emergency room, where they determine he’s recently had surgery to have a kidney removed. There are problems however, and he succumbs to problems from the botched surgery. It goes on fairly unnoticed, until other homeless people end up with their kidneys missing.

David McBride is a former transplant surgeon. Due to a scandal with a fellow doctor, he is fired, and reduced to working as a lab technician. Just as he’s gotten a second chance at life, a mysterious stranger approaches David with a dark offer. It turns out however, that David doesn’t really get a choice in the matter. At this point, the story begins to remind me of a medical thriller version of The Firm. You know who the bad guys are, but David has no clue.

The medical details are very well done, and well explained. I actually learned a lot about the process involved in kidney donations. While the subject matter is a bit dark, I’d recommend it for older teens and adult audiences.

I found myself really enjoying this story, and running along in David’s footsteps as he tries to find a way out of the mess he’s in. But will he get out, or will those he loves suffer. To find the answers to that, you’ll have to read the book. So go out, grab a copy, and let us know what you thought.

About the Author

Richard Van AndersonI’m a former heart surgeon and now write full time. I have a medical degree from St. Louis University School of Medicine; performed my general surgery residency at Louisiana State University in Shreveport, Louisiana; attended a two-year research fellowship at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland; and trained in cardiothoracic surgery at New York University. Following my training, I served as a surgical attending at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, and held a joint appointment as Chief of Cardiac Surgery, Seattle Veterans Administration Hospital. My writing instruction includes Internet-based courses, night classes at the University of Washington, and I earned an MFA degree in creative writing from Pine Manor College in Boston, where I was mentored by a distinguished faculty, including New York Times bestselling author Dennis Lehane. I live in Bellevue, Washington, which is a suburb of Seattle.

During my surgical career I violated every cavity and laid hands on every organ in the human body. I’ve drilled holes in the skull, amputated big toes and excised, resected, patched and repaired every body part in between. I know human anatomy, physiology, the pathology of human disease and the carnage that can be wreaked upon the human organism by his fellow man, by machine and by Mother Nature. I’ve spent countless hours standing across the operating table from egomaniacal surgical attendings, and I’ve personally witnessed high-achieving members of a noble profession become corrupted by the quest for notoriety and wealth. This vast experience, combined with a deep understanding of story and character, has resulted in works of fiction that will not only entertain, but will venture below the surface to explore how men of intelligence, drive and compassion sometimes choose, or are forced, to venture down dark paths.

*Disclaimer* A special thanks goes out to Larissa at Claire McKinney PR for a review copy of this book. It in no way influenced my review. You can discuss it here or join my facebook page and discuss it there.

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Review: Noise – Brett Garcia Rose

Posted on: March 26th, 2015 By Rick Rhodes
Noise
Paperback: 236 pages
Publisher: Velocity Imprints (June 17, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0991549406
ISBN-13: 978-ISBN-13: 978-0991549405
Order book here:

amazon

Order E-book here:
amazon

Synopsis:

The world is an ugly place, and I can tell you now, I fit in just fine.

Lily is the only person Leon ever loved. When she left a suicide note and disappeared into a murky lake ten years ago, she left him alone, drifting through a silent landscape.

Or did she?

A postcard in her handwriting pulls Leon to the winter-cold concrete heart of New York City.

What he discovers unleashes a deadly rage that has no sound.

A grisly trail of clues leads to The Bear, the sadistic Russian crime lord who traffics in human flesh. The police—some corrupt, some merely compromised—are of little help. They don’t like Leon’s methods, or the mess he leaves in his wake.

Leon is deaf, but no sane person would ever call him disabled. He survived as a child on the merciless streets of Nigeria. He misses nothing. He feels no remorse. The only direction he’s ever known is forward.

He will not stop until he knows.

Where is Lily?

Characters:

Leon – Deaf man seeking his “sister”.

Review

I wasn’t sure how the author would go about writing this book. When you think about it, dialogue is an essential part of telling a story. So I wasn’t expecting as much dialogue as I got. But, the author managed to get it covered in a realistic manner. The character of Leon would communicate by writing, and reading lips. Reading this felt very true to what I would imagine the deaf experience to be.

Now that aside, what was the rest of the story like. Action packed. Leon is no weakling. I could very well see this story playing out on the big screen. It was an incredible action/thriller The plot was interesting, and it was a thrill a minute, as the reader follows Leon on the trail of his sister.

I’d rate it NC-17 for all the violence and language, but for those who enjoy a good action film, this is definitely the literary version. Pick up a copy, give it a read, and drop back by and let us know what you thought.

About the Author

Brett Garcia RoseBrett Garcia Rose is a software entrepreneur, former animal rights investigator/activist, and fiction writer. Brett’s work can be found in various literary and consumer publications including Newsday Magazine, The Barcelona Review, Opium, Lit Up, Rose and Thorn, The Battered Suitcase and many other publications.

Losing Found Things, a collection of previously published short fiction, will be available in 2014, along with his first novel, Noise. He is currently living in Miami Beach, working hard on his second novel, Ren.

*Disclaimer* A special thanks goes out to Kelsey at Book Publicity Services for a review copy of this book. It in no way influenced my review. You can discuss it here or join my facebook page and discuss it there.

Review: Guardian – Natasha Deen

Posted on: March 24th, 2015 By Rick Rhodes
Guardian
Paperback: 272 pages
Publisher: Great Plains Teen Fiction (September 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1927855098
ISBN-13: 978-1927855096
Order book here:

amazon

Synopsis:

For seventeen-year-old Maggie Johnson, transitioning the dead isn’t hard. What’s tough is surviving the insults and pranks of Serge Popov, high school thug and the dumbest jock to ever set foot in Dead Falls, Alberta. When she finds him dead and later discovers his spirit trapped in her room, she figures it’s a case of divine justice. Let the jerk rot for eternity, bound to an earthly prison. But someone – or something – has a different agenda. If Maggie doesn’t help Serge cross over, she’ll die at the hands of the otherworldly entity that’s taken an interest in the dead bully. As she digs into the circumstances of Serge’s murder, she’ll uncover the secrets hidden by the world of the living and the wonders revealed by cities of the dead – if her investigation doesn’t kill her first.

Characters:

Maggie Johnson – Young High School girl discovering she has the ability to see and talk to the dead.
Serge Popov – Young High School boy, who is found dead.  Now he wants Maggie to find out why.

Review

This seemed like a strong departure for Ms. Deen, particularly from past works I’ve read of hers. I was used to books that were a bit of a mystery/thrillers but with comic twists. There wasn’t much lighthearted about this, and I think that was a good thing. The characters were so rich, and living. There were also big shifts. I began the story absolutely detesting the character of Serge. There wasn’t a thing to like about him. As a reader I was taken on the same journey as Maggie. I had to learn to tolerate him, and as I learned more about him, I actually began to feel sorry for the guy. To pull you in, and make you have real feelings towards the characters, is a beautiful gift.

It seems as if the story was left open at the end for further adventures of Maggie. If that is true, then I look forward to where her new life might take her. The plotting was very tight, and while I as the reader knew what was going on before the end, there were many other surprises in store for me.

Overall a great story, by a great author. I look forward to more of the story. Due to some dark imagery, I wouldn’t recommend this for all ages, but would recommend it for older teens and adults. So pick up a copy of Guardian, and be sure to stop back by and let us know what you thought.

About the Author

Natasha DeenWhen I was little, there was only one thing I wanted to be when I grew up: a superhero. Sadly, this goal was made moot when I realized that being a klutz was not in fact, a super power, and my super-weakness for anything bright and shiny meant that a magpie with self-control could easily defeat me in a battle of wills. Hence, the turn to writing as an occupation. I don’t get to live on a secret space station orbiting the earth (and thank God, because I get motion sick on a merry-go-round), but I still get to wear leotards, a cape and say things like, “STAND ASIDE! THIS IS A JOB FOR WRITING-GIRL!”

*Disclaimer* A special thanks goes out to Natasha for a review copy of this book. It in no way influenced my review. You can discuss it here or join my facebook page and discuss it there.